spaceadmiraldee
we-are-star-stuff:
7 scientists killed by their own experiments
When we think of scientists and researchers, a passion for discovery, not a penchant for daredevil antics, is usually what comes to mind. Yet many a researcher has faced injury, illness and even death in the name of scientific breakthroughs. After all, when dissecting the mysteries of plague and plutonium, it doesn’t take much for things to go terribly wrong.
Whether through naiveté or simple slip-ups, these scientists all met their death because of the experiments they were conducting. 
1. Carl Scheele  (1742-1786)
The genius pharmaceutical chemist discovered many new elements, most famously oxygen (even if Joseph Priestley did publish his findings first and get all the glory), as well as molybdenum, tungsten, manganese and chlorine. But these were the days before OSHA and the knowledge of just how toxic chemical concoctions could be. Scheele had the bad habit of using all of his senses in his work, including smell and taste. He managed to survive his taste-test of hydrogen cyanide, but cumulative exposure to mercury, lead, fluoric acid, and other nasty toxins finally did him in, leading to his demise thanks to heavy metal toxicity at the age of 44.
2. Elizabeth Fleischman Ascheim (1859-1905)
Upon learning of the discovery of X-rays by Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen, California girl Elizabeth Fleischman Ascheim gave up her job as a bookkeeper and enrolled in electrical science school. She was a quick study, and soon purchased X-ray equipment to open one of the first X-ray labs in the country. Along with her physician brother-in-law, she began obsessively experimenting with the medium — often with the two of them spending long days X-raying each other in the name of science. She saw many patients from the Spanish-American War and went on to specialize in dental work, earning a reputation as a remarkable radiologist. Yet she refused to protect herself during experiments and treating patients, saying that it would make her patients uncomfortable with the procedure to see her using protection. She died of radiation poisoning at the age of 46, and is remembered as one of the “martyrs to radiology.”
3. Alexander Bogdanov (1873-1928)
The Russian Bogdanov was a physician, economist, philosopher, natural scientist, science fiction writer, poet, teacher, politician, revolutionary, an early pioneer of cybernetics and organizational science, and founder of the world’s first institution devoted entirely to blood transfusions — the Soviet Institute for Blood Transfusion, which he opened in 1926. He was a pioneer in hematology, and went so far as to perform 11 transfusions on himself, which he declared cured his balding and improved his eyesight. Unfortunately, his last transfusion was tainted with malaria and tuberculosis, putting an end to his life and his remarkable first-person research.
4. Marie Curie (1867-1934)
The discovery of radioactivity by Henri Becquerel in 1896 inspired the research of science power couple, Marie and Pierre Curie. Their brilliant research and analysis led to the isolation of polonium, named after Marie’s homeland, and radium. Marie spent her life conducting radiation research and studying radiation therapy, yet her continual exposure to the elements led to leukemia, which took its toll in 1934. Among her many accolades, she has been the only person to receive two Nobel prizes in science in two different fields: chemistry and physics.
5. Haroutune (Harry) K. Daghlian Jr. (1921-1945)
American physicist Harry Daghlian was part of on the Manhattan Project at the remote Omega Site facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico. On Aug 21, 1945, during a critical mass experiment, he accidentally dropped a tungsten carbide brick onto a plutonium bomb core. The mishap caused a critical reaction, and Daghlian quickly tried to knock the brick away, unsuccessfully, and resorted to removing the bricks by hand to halt the reaction. He stopped the reaction, but was exposed to massive amounts of radiation. He died 25 days later.
6. Malcolm Casadaban (1949-2009)
An associate professor of molecular genetics and cell biology and microbiology at the University of Chicago, specialist Casadaban was performing laboratory research on the bacterium that causes the plague when he became sick and died from plague. According to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report on the incident, the strain that killed Casadaban had never been known to infect laboratory workers as it was a genetically weakened strain. Casadaban was found to have undiagnosed hereditary hemochromatosis, which likely played in a role in his death.
7. Richard Din (1987-2012)
Researcher Richard Din worked at the Northern California Institute for Research and Education, where the focus of his research had been developing a vaccine to protect against the dangerous bacterium known as Neisseria meningitidis, a strain of bacteria that causes meningococcal disease, and leads to meningitis and bloodstream infections. The UC Berkeley graduate came down with a headache and nausea, and by the next morning his symptoms had worsened enough to require a hospital visit. His condition deteriorated quickly, and he died 17 hours after his symptoms first appeared. The cause? Meningococcal disease from the bacterium he had been working on. No accidents had occurred, and Din was said to have been a fastidious, rule-following worker, but he wasn’t vaccinated for the illness despite CDC recommendations to the contrary. (Although, likely a vaccine wouldn’t help, since it was a vaccine he was working on for a strain that was resistant to vaccine.) Fortunately, about 70 people who came into contact with Din promptly received antibiotic treatment and none of them came down with the illness.
[via]

we-are-star-stuff:

7 scientists killed by their own experiments

When we think of scientists and researchers, a passion for discovery, not a penchant for daredevil antics, is usually what comes to mind. Yet many a researcher has faced injury, illness and even death in the name of scientific breakthroughs. After all, when dissecting the mysteries of plague and plutonium, it doesn’t take much for things to go terribly wrong.

Whether through naiveté or simple slip-ups, these scientists all met their death because of the experiments they were conducting. 

1. Carl Scheele  (1742-1786)

The genius pharmaceutical chemist discovered many new elements, most famously oxygen (even if Joseph Priestley did publish his findings first and get all the glory), as well as molybdenum, tungsten, manganese and chlorine. But these were the days before OSHA and the knowledge of just how toxic chemical concoctions could be. Scheele had the bad habit of using all of his senses in his work, including smell and taste. He managed to survive his taste-test of hydrogen cyanide, but cumulative exposure to mercury, lead, fluoric acid, and other nasty toxins finally did him in, leading to his demise thanks to heavy metal toxicity at the age of 44.

2. Elizabeth Fleischman Ascheim (1859-1905)

Upon learning of the discovery of X-rays by Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen, California girl Elizabeth Fleischman Ascheim gave up her job as a bookkeeper and enrolled in electrical science school. She was a quick study, and soon purchased X-ray equipment to open one of the first X-ray labs in the country. Along with her physician brother-in-law, she began obsessively experimenting with the medium — often with the two of them spending long days X-raying each other in the name of science. She saw many patients from the Spanish-American War and went on to specialize in dental work, earning a reputation as a remarkable radiologist. Yet she refused to protect herself during experiments and treating patients, saying that it would make her patients uncomfortable with the procedure to see her using protection. She died of radiation poisoning at the age of 46, and is remembered as one of the “martyrs to radiology.”

3. Alexander Bogdanov (1873-1928)

The Russian Bogdanov was a physician, economist, philosopher, natural scientist, science fiction writer, poet, teacher, politician, revolutionary, an early pioneer of cybernetics and organizational science, and founder of the world’s first institution devoted entirely to blood transfusions — the Soviet Institute for Blood Transfusion, which he opened in 1926. He was a pioneer in hematology, and went so far as to perform 11 transfusions on himself, which he declared cured his balding and improved his eyesight. Unfortunately, his last transfusion was tainted with malaria and tuberculosis, putting an end to his life and his remarkable first-person research.

4. Marie Curie (1867-1934)

The discovery of radioactivity by Henri Becquerel in 1896 inspired the research of science power couple, Marie and Pierre Curie. Their brilliant research and analysis led to the isolation of polonium, named after Marie’s homeland, and radium. Marie spent her life conducting radiation research and studying radiation therapy, yet her continual exposure to the elements led to leukemia, which took its toll in 1934. Among her many accolades, she has been the only person to receive two Nobel prizes in science in two different fields: chemistry and physics.

5. Haroutune (Harry) K. Daghlian Jr. (1921-1945)

American physicist Harry Daghlian was part of on the Manhattan Project at the remote Omega Site facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico. On Aug 21, 1945, during a critical mass experiment, he accidentally dropped a tungsten carbide brick onto a plutonium bomb core. The mishap caused a critical reaction, and Daghlian quickly tried to knock the brick away, unsuccessfully, and resorted to removing the bricks by hand to halt the reaction. He stopped the reaction, but was exposed to massive amounts of radiation. He died 25 days later.

6. Malcolm Casadaban (1949-2009)

An associate professor of molecular genetics and cell biology and microbiology at the University of Chicago, specialist Casadaban was performing laboratory research on the bacterium that causes the plague when he became sick and died from plague. According to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report on the incident, the strain that killed Casadaban had never been known to infect laboratory workers as it was a genetically weakened strain. Casadaban was found to have undiagnosed hereditary hemochromatosis, which likely played in a role in his death.

7. Richard Din (1987-2012)

Researcher Richard Din worked at the Northern California Institute for Research and Education, where the focus of his research had been developing a vaccine to protect against the dangerous bacterium known as Neisseria meningitidis, a strain of bacteria that causes meningococcal disease, and leads to meningitis and bloodstream infections. The UC Berkeley graduate came down with a headache and nausea, and by the next morning his symptoms had worsened enough to require a hospital visit. His condition deteriorated quickly, and he died 17 hours after his symptoms first appeared. The cause? Meningococcal disease from the bacterium he had been working on. No accidents had occurred, and Din was said to have been a fastidious, rule-following worker, but he wasn’t vaccinated for the illness despite CDC recommendations to the contrary. (Although, likely a vaccine wouldn’t help, since it was a vaccine he was working on for a strain that was resistant to vaccine.) Fortunately, about 70 people who came into contact with Din promptly received antibiotic treatment and none of them came down with the illness.

[via]

Scotland Quern Stone

PERTHSHIRE, SCOTLAND—While repairing a field wall on a hillside, volunteers with the Scottish Wildlife Trust discovered a stone in the wall that was shaped like a shallow basin. It may be half of a 6,000-year-old quern stone, used by Neolithic people to grind grain into flour. Roundhouses, rock art, and burial mounds have also been found in the area, known as Balnaguard Glen. “We are more than happy to give it a home in the museum, after clearance with Scottish Treasure Trove,” said Mark Mall of the Perth Museum and Art Gallery.

Archaeologists from the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences said the find is unique and unlike any other carriage dating from the Thracian era.

The carriage and horse skeletons were discovered in the village of Svestari in north-east Bulgaria

They were found in a Thracian tomb along with some decorations 

The discovery was unexpected as treasure hunters have plundered many of the ancient mounds found in the region

“I have spent a lot of time, some would say wasted a lot of time, engaging critically with claims made by Simcha Jacobovici in relation to two tombs excavated in Talpiot, East Jerusalem.  I won’t go into detail on how things have panned out in the past, but I documented some of it in my article published on The Talpiot Tomb and the Bloggers, and have written a lot about it here on the NT Blog.  My most recent extended discussion is found on Bible and InterpretationThe Jesus Discovery? A Sceptic’s Perspective, an article based on an enjoyable critical exchange with James Tabor and Christopher Rollston at SECSOR in March this year.


The general response from Simcha Jacobovici himself has either been dismissal or mockery.  Although he asked his critics to point out the mistakes, he has never responded to my attempts to explain why I am unconvinced by his claims, preferring instead either to ignore the critical response or to mock what he calls underwear bloggers.  That’s me, and people like me, sitting on the couch, blogging in our underpants while we eat takeaway pizza!”

 

webseofaqs
webseofaqs:

Traveling is fun, even if it’s just for business. However, traveling can also be expensive and the costlier it is, the less enjoying it could be. Read this article to see how you can cut costs while still having a fun trip. Leave your valuables at home. Too many items often burden travelers with additional responsibility, which increases the possibility of these items getting lost or stolen. Always plan ahead when traveling by air. Most major airports are situated in busy cities, so driving to an airport can take a very long time during periods of heavy traffic. Pack what you can the night before your flight so you are sure to be ready to leave the next day. Make the necessary preparations prior to flying. It is horrible to miss a flight. Be aware that in some foreign cities many criminals will pose as policemen. Never hand over your original passport, as you might not get it back. If they state you must go to an office, offer to walk the distance with them. Always use common sense and never accept a ride from a stranger. If you are leaving for your trip from a port city, stay at a hotel with free parking and get there the night before you are to leave. Check with the hotel staff about parking deals even if none are published. Try getting in a big workout before you board the plane. Long flights are found to be hard to sit through. Having to remain seated in one position that long can give you cramps in your back and legs. Exercise or, at the least, a session of stretching prior to a flight can minimize your cramps and eliminate sore muscles. There are many beautiful vistas and unusual fauna and flora in a desert. Most people find themselves struck by the quiet majesty of a desert, even though visiting a desert does not sound like much fun. If you travel wisely and apply these tips, you will be able to avoid some of the common inconveniences faced by inexperienced travelers. You will be much happier at your destination when you realize that you saved a lot of money without losing the enjoyment.

webseofaqs:

Traveling is fun, even if it’s just for business. However, traveling can also be expensive and the costlier it is, the less enjoying it could be. Read this article to see how you can cut costs while still having a fun trip. Leave your valuables at home. Too many items often burden travelers with additional responsibility, which increases the possibility of these items getting lost or stolen. Always plan ahead when traveling by air. Most major airports are situated in busy cities, so driving to an airport can take a very long time during periods of heavy traffic. Pack what you can the night before your flight so you are sure to be ready to leave the next day. Make the necessary preparations prior to flying. It is horrible to miss a flight. Be aware that in some foreign cities many criminals will pose as policemen. Never hand over your original passport, as you might not get it back. If they state you must go to an office, offer to walk the distance with them. Always use common sense and never accept a ride from a stranger. If you are leaving for your trip from a port city, stay at a hotel with free parking and get there the night before you are to leave. Check with the hotel staff about parking deals even if none are published. Try getting in a big workout before you board the plane. Long flights are found to be hard to sit through. Having to remain seated in one position that long can give you cramps in your back and legs. Exercise or, at the least, a session of stretching prior to a flight can minimize your cramps and eliminate sore muscles. There are many beautiful vistas and unusual fauna and flora in a desert. Most people find themselves struck by the quiet majesty of a desert, even though visiting a desert does not sound like much fun. If you travel wisely and apply these tips, you will be able to avoid some of the common inconveniences faced by inexperienced travelers. You will be much happier at your destination when you realize that you saved a lot of money without losing the enjoyment.

archaeologicalnews

archaeologicalnews:

image

The archaeological excavations being conducted at the site of ancient Gezer in northwestern Israel have recently revealed some tantalizing finds, one of which came as a surprise to excavators who just completed digging there during the summer of 2013.

"In this, the sixth season of excavation," reports co-directors Steven Ortiz of the Southwest Baptist Theological Seminary and Samuel Wolff of the Israel Antiquities Authority, "one goal was to remove a portion of the city wall built in the Iron IIA period (10th century BCE) in order to investigate a Late Bronze age destruction level (ca. 1400 BCE) that lay below it. To the surprise of the team, in the process of excavating the city wall, an earlier wall system dating to the Iron Age I (1200-1000 BCE) was discovered." Read more.