archaeologychannel
archaeologychannel:
ANNOUNCING the IndijiRadio Kickstarter campaign!
The world is full of music. It always has been, as long as modern humans have inhabited the earth. People always have sung. People made musical instruments tens of thousands of years ago.  Indigenous music is at the roots of all human music. It exists in hundreds of different traditions all over the world. However, native musical traditions have to compete against the modern, produced, pop music that is sweeping over the world. That need is why we are planning to launch IndijiRadio. For the next 30 days, Kickstarter will accept pledges for IndijiRadio with a goal of $38,000.
Your pledges will pay not only to launch IndijiRadio, but also allow us to recruit sponsors to cover our continuing costs for next year and the years to come.  A worldwide audience base will give sponsor prospects a good reason to get on board.  Indigenous organizations around the world will step up to partner with us and help us grow both in program content and financial support.  But it all begins here, with you and this Kickstarter campaign.  Together we will create a new kind of radio station with roots everywhere and connecting us all through the language of music.
PLEASE VISIT OUR KICKSTARTER PAGE TO DONATE: http://kck.st/15mDd7t
29 days to go!

archaeologychannel:

ANNOUNCING the IndijiRadio Kickstarter campaign!

The world is full of music. It always has been, as long as modern humans have inhabited the earth. People always have sung. People made musical instruments tens of thousands of years ago.  Indigenous music is at the roots of all human music. It exists in hundreds of different traditions all over the world. However, native musical traditions have to compete against the modern, produced, pop music that is sweeping over the world. That need is why we are planning to launch IndijiRadio. For the next 30 days, Kickstarter will accept pledges for IndijiRadio with a goal of $38,000.

Your pledges will pay not only to launch IndijiRadio, but also allow us to recruit sponsors to cover our continuing costs for next year and the years to come.  A worldwide audience base will give sponsor prospects a good reason to get on board.  Indigenous organizations around the world will step up to partner with us and help us grow both in program content and financial support.  But it all begins here, with you and this Kickstarter campaign.  Together we will create a new kind of radio station with roots everywhere and connecting us all through the language of music.

PLEASE VISIT OUR KICKSTARTER PAGE TO DONATE: http://kck.st/15mDd7t

29 days to go!

slothisticated

slothisticated:

The Oseberg Viking Ship Burial

In 1904 a remarkable archaeological site was uncovered at Oseberg, Norway. It consisted of an astonishingly well-preserved Viking ship that contained the remains of two women along with a wide array of accompanying grave goods. This vessel, which is widely celebrated as one of the finest finds of the Viking Age, had been buried within a large mound or haugr.

The burial mound measured approximately 40m long by 6.5m high and it completely covered the boat. The conditions within the mound were particularly damp and this meant that the ship and its contents survived nearly intact. Constructed primarily out of oak planks, the vessel measured 21.40m long by 5.10m wide. Its bow and stern were covered in elaborate carvings, while it contained 15 pairs of oar holes which meant up to 30 men could row the ship as required.

Centrally placed on the ship were the skeletons of two women whose remains had been placed in a specially built wooden tent. One of the woman was in her eighties and this was reflected in the condition of her bones which showed that she had suffered badly from arthritis during her final years. The second woman was younger and had died in her early fifties.The connection between the two women is unclear; it is possible that they were related or more sinisterly represent the remains of a noble woman interred with her sacrificed slave. Indeed, some have speculated that one of the women may be Queen Åsa, the grandmother of Norway’s first king, although this remains unproven.

Radiocarbon analysis of the women’s bones indicated that they died c. 1220±40 and 1230±40 before present and this ties in with the dendrochronology dates from the burial tent timbers, which indicate it was constructed in 834 AD. Other skeletal remains found on the ship included 13 horses, 4 dogs and 2 oxen. It is likely that these represent animals that were sacrificed to accompany the female burials into the afterlife.

The grave was disturbed in antiquity and any precious metals that may have been present were stolen. However, a remarkable collection of wooden and textile artifacts were left behind by the grave robbers. These included four elaborately decorated sleighs, a richly carved four-wheel wooden cart, three beds as well as a number of wooden chests. More mundane items such as agricultural and household tools were also found.

The Oseberg ship and its treasure trove of artifacts are currently on display at the Viking Ship Museum, Oslo, Norway.

irefiordiligi

irefiordiligi:

Tomba dell’Aryballos sospeso (Tomb of the hanging Aryballos)

The University of Turin has discorevered an intact tomb of an Etruscan aristocrat in the Necropolis of Doganaccia, Tarquinia.

Blocked by a perfectly sealed stone slab, the rock-cut tomb in Tarquinia appeared promising even before opening it.

Indeed, several objects, including jars, vases and even a grater, were found in the soil in front of the stone door, indicating that a funeral rite of an important person took place there.

As the heavy stone slab was removed, Mandolesi and his team were left breathless. In the small vaulted chamber, the complete skeleton of an individual was resting on a stone bed on the left. A spear lay along the body, while fibulae, or brooches, on the chest indicated that the individual, a man, was probably once dressed with a mantle.

At his feet stood a large bronze basin and a dish with food remains, while the stone table on the right might have contained the incinerated remains of another individual.

Decorated with a red strip, the upper part of the wall featured, along with several nails, a small hanging vase, which might have contained some ointment. A number of grave goods, which included large Greek Corinthian vases and precious ornaments, lay on the floor.

The vases and ornaments on the floor may have once been hanging on the wall like the little aryballos — a vessel for oils and unguents — which was so amazingly still hanging from its nail when the archaeologists opened the tomb. The heavier pieces are thought to have fallen due to structural failings of the tomb and/or seismic activity. Among the vases were seals which might help identify the deceased and fragments of what may have been armour.

source: x, x, x,

xmorbidcuriosityx
xmorbidcuriosityx:


Londonderry dig: 13 skeletons found
A total of 13 skeletons have been found during an archaeological dig within the city walls in Londonderry.
The first set of remains were unearthed at an archaeological dig at Bishop Street car park, near St Augustine’s cemetery on Friday.
It has been suggested that the skeletons may have been there since the 17th Century.
Researchers suggest that the position of the skeletons may reflect traditional Christianity.
Lead archaeologist Emily Murray said: “We were always expecting more.
"We have only excavated seven skeletons so far but 13 have been found. There could be more.
"We found feet bones that are quite small."

(Source: BBC News)

xmorbidcuriosityx:

Londonderry dig: 13 skeletons found

A total of 13 skeletons have been found during an archaeological dig within the city walls in Londonderry.

The first set of remains were unearthed at an archaeological dig at Bishop Street car park, near St Augustine’s cemetery on Friday.

It has been suggested that the skeletons may have been there since the 17th Century.

Researchers suggest that the position of the skeletons may reflect traditional Christianity.

Lead archaeologist Emily Murray said: “We were always expecting more.

"We have only excavated seven skeletons so far but 13 have been found. There could be more.

"We found feet bones that are quite small."

(Source: BBC News)

theolduvaigorge

theolduvaigorge:

World’s oldest bog body hints at violent past

  • by Matt McGrath

“Cashel Man has had the weight of the world on his shoulders, quite literally, for 4,000 years.

Compressed by the peat that has preserved his remains, he looks like a squashed, dark leather holdall.

Apart, that is, from one forlorn arm that stretches out and upward and tells us something of the deliberate and extremely violent death that he suffered 500 years before Tutankhamen was born.

Cashel Man is now being studied at the National Museum of Ireland’s research base in Collins Barracks, Dublin. He was discovered in 2011 by a bog worker in Cashel bog in County Laois. When the remains are brought out of the freezer, it is hard to tell that this was ever a human being.

Scientists say that there were significant clues to the social status of three bog bodies found in Ireland since the start of this century

  • Clonycavan Man (L) was said to be wearing a type of expensive, imported hair gel
  • Old Croghan Man (C) had finely manicured nails
  • Cashel Man (R) was found very close to the inauguration site for the kings of Laois

"It does look like mangled peat at first," says researcher Carol Smith. "But then you can see the pores on the skin and it takes on a very human aspect quite quickly." Carol starts to spray the body with non-ionised water. This prevents it deteriorating when exposed to room temperatures. As we peer at the glistening bog-tanned body, we can see small, dark hairs on the skin, and a trail of vertebrae along his back” (read more).

***Posting cos it’s Laois.

(Source: BBC)

Cyprus Mail News and More

Archaeologists unearth earliest complete human figurine in CyprusEXCAVATIONS at Ayia Varvara-Asprokremnos have uncovered the earliest complete human figurine currently known on Cyprus, the Antiquities Department said yesterday.

The age of the statue could range from 10,500 to 11,000 years old based on the fact it was discovered at a site that has been radio-carbon dated to between 8800-8600 BC.

The period marks the beginning of the Neolithic period in Cyprus at a time when the transition from hunting to farming economies was beginning throughout the Middle East.

“Taking the Neolithic Revolution into the Mediterranean zone, the occupants of Ayia Varvara-Asprokremnos carried cultural traditions and intensive resource procurement and manufacturing activity to the island some 11,000 years before the present,” said a statement from the department.

archaicwonder
archaicwonder:

Tetradrachm minted on Tenedos, (Mysia, Islands off Troas) c. 100-70 BC  The coin features a janiform, laureate head of Zeus and the diademed head of Hera. On the reverse TENEDIWN is inscribed above a double axe (labrys). Below is the monogram of PA and bunch of grapes. Below on the right are caps of the Dioscouri (Castor and Pollux) and all is surrounded by a laurel wreath. 
The early coins of Tenedos bore janiform heads similar to the one here, but on those the male head was bare and without a laurel wreath. Those heads portrayed two characters from a local legend: Tenes and, probably, his young step-mother and lover, Philonome. However, even in ancient times the combination of the janiform, male/female head and the double axe on the reverse gave rise to tales of the punishment for adultery, and by the end of the 5th century the janiform head on the coins of Tenedos was transformed into one of Zeus and Hera. After a long break when the only silver coins struck were posthumous Lysimachus tetradrachms, Tenedos resumed minting silver during the 1st century BC with a series of tetradrachms and drachms, like the present example. These coins are uniformly very rare.
Alexandria Troas (“Alexandria of the Troad”) is an ancient Greek city of Mysia on the Aegean Sea near the northern tip of Turkey’s western coast, a little south of island of Tenedos (modern Bozcaada). Tenedos is mentioned in both the Iliad and the Aeneid.  In the Aeneid, Tenedos is the site where the Greeks hid their fleet near the end of the Trojan War in order to trick the Trojans into believing the war was over and into taking the Trojan Horse within their city walls.

archaicwonder:

Tetradrachm minted on Tenedos, (Mysia, Islands off Troas) c. 100-70 BC 

The coin features a janiform, laureate head of Zeus and the diademed head of Hera. On the reverse TENEDIWN is inscribed above a double axe (labrys). Below is the monogram of PA and bunch of grapes. Below on the right are caps of the Dioscouri (Castor and Pollux) and all is surrounded by a laurel wreath.


The early coins of Tenedos bore janiform heads similar to the one here, but on those the male head was bare and without a laurel wreath. Those heads portrayed two characters from a local legend: Tenes and, probably, his young step-mother and lover, Philonome. However, even in ancient times the combination of the janiform, male/female head and the double axe on the reverse gave rise to tales of the punishment for adultery, and by the end of the 5th century the janiform head on the coins of Tenedos was transformed into one of Zeus and Hera. After a long break when the only silver coins struck were posthumous Lysimachus tetradrachms, Tenedos resumed minting silver during the 1st century BC with a series of tetradrachms and drachms, like the present example. These coins are uniformly very rare.


Alexandria Troas (“Alexandria of the Troad”) is an ancient Greek city of Mysia on the Aegean Sea near the northern tip of Turkey’s western coast, a little south of island of Tenedos (modern Bozcaada). Tenedos is mentioned in both the Iliad and the Aeneid.  In the Aeneid, Tenedos is the site where the Greeks hid their fleet near the end of the Trojan War in order to trick the Trojans into believing the war was over and into taking the Trojan Horse within their city walls.

wolfdancer
ancientpeoples:

Mirror Box with Head of Athena
early 4th Century BCE
Greece
These case or box mirrors, constructed just like modern, hinged ladies’ compacts, were very fashionable from the later 5th century into the 4th century. The decoration of the cover was always in repoussé. Frequently there was another disk within this cover with an incised decoration of a mythological figure. The actual mirror is the highly polished top of the bottom half of the box. A loop at the hinge allowed the mirror to be suspended as a wall decoration when not in active use.
Source: Cleveland Museum of Art

ancientpeoples:

Mirror Box with Head of Athena

early 4th Century BCE

Greece

These case or box mirrors, constructed just like modern, hinged ladies’ compacts, were very fashionable from the later 5th century into the 4th century. The decoration of the cover was always in repoussé. Frequently there was another disk within this cover with an incised decoration of a mythological figure. The actual mirror is the highly polished top of the bottom half of the box. A loop at the hinge allowed the mirror to be suspended as a wall decoration when not in active use.

Source: Cleveland Museum of Art

xmorbidcuriosityx

xmorbidcuriosityx:

A 2,000-year-old skeleton with a mask on its face has been found in the Aizanoi ancient city in Kütahya.

(Source: Hurriyet Daily News)

A 2,000-year-old skeleton with a mask on its face has been found in the Aizanoi ancient city in Kütahya, during excavations in the area which have been continuing for two years now with new findings emerging.

Speaking to Anadolu Agency, excavation group president Pamukkale University Archeology academic Elif Özer said the excavations had been ongoing since 2011, and many findings had been excavated from the area. The skeleton was excavated from the northern part of the necropolis eras.

(The mask of the skeleton was found along with the face and the body.)

archaeoblogs
archaeoblogs:

CLOVIS POINTS – PALEOINDIAN BOY SCOUT KNIVES?Source: http://bit.ly/16tQ5GI (image)Exceptionally fine Clovis point from Fairfield County, Ohio. It is 138 mm long. A851/011 Clovis points are undeniably special. For one thing, they are among the oldest artifacts in America. (Some archaeologists would remove the qualification and say they are THE oldest, but the evidence and arguments for a pre-Clovis human presence in the Americas are compelling – at least to me.) In addition to being really old, 13,000 years old give or take a century or two, Clovis points also are large, beautifully-crafted, often made from high-quality flint, and at least occasionally were used………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

archaeoblogs:

CLOVIS POINTS – PALEOINDIAN BOY SCOUT KNIVES?
Source: http://bit.ly/16tQ5GI

(image)Exceptionally fine Clovis point from Fairfield County, Ohio. It is 138 mm long. A851/011 Clovis points are undeniably special. For one thing, they are among the oldest artifacts in America. (Some archaeologists would remove the qualification and say they are THE oldest, but the evidence and arguments for a pre-Clovis human presence in the Americas are compelling – at least to me.) In addition to being really old, 13,000 years old give or take a century or two, Clovis points also are large, beautifully-crafted, often made from high-quality flint, and at least occasionally were used………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project